News

New Midland x Vinyl Ranch collaboration

By DAVID WRANGLER

New Midland x Vinyl Ranch collaboration
One day was bored and doodling around in Photoshop. While "Burn Out" by Midland played on the Sonos, a revelation came forward. The result is this sick 70s throwback remix for the homies in Midland! Grab one on their tour merch line and website.

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Johnny Cash & Cowboy Jack Clement's Home Video

By DAVID WRANGLER

Johnny Cash & Cowboy Jack Clement's Home Video
Cowboy Jack hangs with Johnny Cash. They visit the gravesite of A.P. Carter, the father of country music. Excellent VHS quality short, chock full of shenanigans.

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Rodeo Bloopers (1990)

By DAVID WRANGLER

Rodeo Bloopers (1990)

The most dangerous sport in the world. Bullriding. It's not when you get hurt, but if and how bad.



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Sundays at Skinny Dennis General Store

By DAVID WRANGLER

Sundays at Skinny Dennis General Store

Every Sunday in September, join us as we transform Skinny Dennis into the General Store. Shop selections from Wild West Brooklyn, Daisy & Elizabeth and Vinyl Ranch. Tacos by Salsa Pistolero and DJ set by Disko Cowboy.

Skinny Dennis General Store

Skinny Dennis
152 Metropolitan Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11211

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CALL 1-800-FARMAID (1985) Full Concert

By DAVID WRANGLER

CALL 1-800-FARMAID (1985) Full Concert

Call the number to support farmers in America. God Bless Willie Nelson & Farm Aid.

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Stand By The JAMS (The KLF feat. Tammy Wynette)

By DAVID WRANGLER

Stand By The JAMS (The KLF feat. Tammy Wynette)


"Justified & Ancient" is a song by British band the KLF (Bill Drummond and Jimmy Cauty) which featured on their 1991 album The White Room but with origins dating back to the duo's debut album, 1987 (What the Fuck Is Going On?).

The song is best known for its remake that was released in November 1991 as a pop-house single subtitled "Stand by The JAMs", with verses featuring the vocals of American country music singer Tammy Wynette. This version was an international hit, reaching number 2 on both the UK Singles Chart, and the US dance chart, number 11 on the US Billboard Hot 100, and hitting number 1 in 18 countries.[1]

Despite its success, "Justified & Ancient (Stand by the JAMs)" was the final release by the KLF through retail channels as well the second-to-last altogether release from the KLF (the last release being the mail-order only re-recording of "3 a.m. Eternal" with Extreme Noise Terror) before Drummond and Cauty quit the music business and retired the KLF name.

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Willie Nelson: the first guest on PBS's Austin City Limits (1975)

By DAVID WRANGLER

Willie Nelson: the first guest on PBS's Austin City Limits (1975)
Willie Nelson's performance aired as the first of many live musical performances on the PBS series Austin City Limits. Check out Willie and The Family as they run through classic tunes from his catalog of hits.

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Rest in peace, Hank Williams

By DAVID WRANGLER

Rest in peace, Hank Williams

Hiram King "Hank" Williams was an American singer-songwriter and musician regarded as one of the most significant country music artists of all time. Williams was born with a mild undiagnosed case of spina bifida occulta, a disorder of the spinal column, which gave him lifelong pain—a factor in his later abuse of alcohol and drugs. In 1951, Williams fell during a hunting trip in Tennessee, reactivating his old back pains and causing him to be dependent on alcohol and prescription drugs. This addiction eventually lead to his divorce from Audrey Williams and his dismissal from the Grand Ole Opry.

Williams was scheduled to perform at the Municipal Auditorium in Charleston, West Virginia. Williams had to cancel the concert due to an ice storm; he hired college student Charles Carr to drive him to his next appearance, a concert on New Year's Day 1953, at the Palace Theater in Canton, Ohio. In Knoxville, Tennessee, the two stopped at the Andrew Johnson Hotel. Carr requested a doctor for Williams, who was feeling the combination of the chloral hydrate and alcohol he consumed on the way from Montgomery. A doctor injected Williams with two shots of vitamin B12 that contained morphine. Carr talked to Williams for the last time when they stopped at a restaurant in Bristol, Virginia. Carr later kept driving until he reached a gas station on Oak Hill, West Virginia, where Williams was discovered unresponsive in the back seat. After determining that Williams was dead, Carr asked for help from the owner of the station who notified the police. After an autopsy, the cause of death was determined to be "insufficiency of the right ventricle of the heart."

Tributes to Williams took place the day after his death. His body was initially transported to Montgomery and placed in a silver coffin shown at his mother's boarding house. The funeral took place on January 4 at the Montgomery Auditorium, where an estimated 15,000 to 25,000 attended while the auditorium was filled with 2,750 mourners.

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